Making the case against an HIV-specific law in Jamaica

This assessment ‘Legal Assessment of the Effectiveness of HIV Criminalisation Laws-from High to Low-Income Countries’ demonstrates why the enactment of an HIV-specific criminal law in Jamaica would be harmful to the national HIV response. It sets out the bases on which the recommendation for an HIV-specific criminal law should be rejected and highlights the need for public health policy considerations to centre the discussions surrounding HIV criminalisation in Jamaica.

Position Statement on Harm Reduction

Acknowledges the harms caused by stigma and criminalisation. In particular, it acknowledges that the harms of criminalisation are borne disproportionally by Indigenous peoples in Canada. The Statement recognises that while people make their own health decisions, these decisions are only one factor influencing health outcomes.

Resolution on HIV Discrimination and Criminalization

Calls for the elimination of HIV-specific criminal laws and implementation of approaches to HIV consistent with the treatment of similar health and safety risks. Endorses the recommendations of the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS for ending federal and state HIV-specific criminal laws, prosecutions, and civil commitments.

AMA Resolution on Modernization of HIV Specific Criminal Laws

Resolution by the American Medical Association (AMA) including condemnation of HIV-based discrimination, calls for laws to be consistent with current scientific knowledge, and encouragement of public education about stigma created by HIV criminalization status and their negative consequences. (Background information provided by the Centre for HIV Law and Policy)

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